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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
grown significantly and as well as we've reduced our nuclear stops, both the united states and russia to the point they're smaller than they used to be, but certainly sufficient right now. those are strategies of an earlier era and we need to think about new policies. explain. >> well, yes, that's exactly right. we got out of the cold war by building more nuclear weapons because it scared the daylights out of the other side, and frankly it scared the daylights out of us. we're not going to get out of this situation by building more weapons. if we built 50 new missiles it would not have an affect on north korea, china or russia. we need new policieses. most forces have not been tested under realistic conditions in 20 years. it's basically junk in the attic. i'm not opposed to getting rid of most it. we need to put out declarations of what the united states will do to prevent others were using nuclear weapons. so i'm very much in favor of the declaration that we will never use nuclear weapons first. what that opens up if someone does use nuclear weapons, that suspends our pledge so we
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
, his efforts are already having an effect. >> in russia, a new law has come into force, requiring organizations that receive funding from abroad to register as foreign agents. dam it conscious of the days of the cold war, and the affected groups are not at all happy about those implications. >> many plan to boycott the law, including an election watchdog. >> this russian election watchdog now has to declare itself a foreign agent because it receives funding from the u.s. and europe. >> it is clear to us that any group that does not register as an agent and is viewed as a nuisance by the state apparatus will be first to be put through the wringer by the authorities. >> the new law passed through parliament during the summer with virtually no public outcry. it is backed by the ruling united russia party, which is allied to president vladimir putin. supporters of the law say it is simply a way to identify groups involved in russian politics who use funds from overseas. >> i do not think it is repression. it is just a way of classifying politically active citizens groups. may be someo
edge -- >> questions to editor she mentioned the cold war. the request and asking what role does russia play in the world going forward. >> it is -- in a challenge of the finding its identity under totally different circumstances. russia has been an imperial power and it has had domestic support by its efforts in asia, the middle east and europe, depending on where it was, now russia has the problem of a declining population. declining russian population and muslim population that is forward of the muslim world. 3,000 miles from china which is based tricky dick nightmare in the sense that there are thirty million russians are on one side and 1 billion chinese on the other end the middle east which is an ideological nightmare and in europe, a historically difficult one for them so how -- and yet the image russia has of its leadership is that they have to be considered as a principal country in order to be taken seriously so fundamentally russia has to look for a pattern of cooperation but found methods of doing it but russia is not strategic to the west, bringing pressure on its neighbor
that more caution is still advise. >> in russia, speculation is rife about the health of vladimir putin. this after the russian president canceled his traditional end of the year call-in show. >> he was also seen living in public. the kremlin says he's fine, but not everyone is convinced. >> in these images from state television, putin seems to be in discomfort. >> i read something on the internet, but i do not think he is seriously ill. everyone has the odd a campaign. >> by september, putin had a noticeable limp. the kremlin said he had pulled a muscle doing judo. >> that is something putin has painstakingly avoided in his 30 years as russia's most powerful politician. he has always been keen to project an image of himself as a virile and vulnerable leader. >> putin will do anything to say in power. anyone who has power clings to it. >> another source of pain might be the latest opinion polls. they suggest that only 15% of russians approve of the way he is running the country. >> well, some sports news now. in formula one racing, sebastian fettle will be looking to take another step t
because we cannot supply them with natural gas. instead of russia. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it is pushing people into cars they do not want to buy raising your much as a cost we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and disproportionately those zero least able to afford it the lowest fifth of and come distribution spend 24 percent of income on electricity natural-gas and gasoline. that's right. spending on energy and compared to an average of 7%. it it is just strange well-intentioned people who purport to represent advocates policies that will do them harm rather than a good british edition to hurric
that russia is worried it stalled on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we can now supplied them with natural gas instead of russia being a bear sole supplier. subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we fought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reductions. and therefore that if we reduce emissions perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming or not but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so we are not going to have any effect on global temperatures and in the first chapter of the book i talk about geo engineering solutions that no prize-winning scientist paul krugman things can reduce global temperatures if we do it on our own such as breaking clouds with salt water or painting room for white to reflect the sun's rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion we're spending on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy, where raising elec
cheap that chemical manufacturers are attracted back to america. it's so cheap that russia is worried his hold on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we cannot supply them at natural gas in southern russia at the initial supply. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pus
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
say that would be one example of one of the smaller markets. of course the bricks, brazil, russia, india, china are still very much in our radar scope but if you look at some of the medium and smaller sized companies and countries you will see companies in thailand and thailand as a country very interesting. >> a lot of western technology firms build for instance disk drives in thailand. when thai experienced severe flooding those western companies got hit. what is attractive about thailand for long-term investors? >> it's mainly political to begin with. as you know they went through a lot of political turmoil. you had the red shirts, the yellow shirts, fighting on the streets of bangkok and so forth but they have a fufl foundation for political stability which is very good. and also they have a very diversified economy. >> we'll continue talking with mark mobius tomorrow, china's communist party selects a new set of leaders this week. we will talk about how this change in power could impact china's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvi
. the syrian conflict. russia. this is 45 minutes. i thought i would start here. there has been a lot of conversation in this room about the transition and this country. this is happening in china. tell us a little bit about what you think this transition will bring. well of bring substantial change to china? stability or instability? >> it will bring both. let me explain. and we tend to look at transitions in the united states. people come in. they have to lie to keep orders. they have insurance. they were made to execute. this is not how transitions are working. the power is much less than that from the president of the united states. he has to govern with the consensus of the standing committee. we can judge what the problem is. he is the chairman of the board. he is the most powerful person. he had to form coalitions within the system. the manner of execution brought the country is not necessarily through the first task. each generation of leaders have reflected a certain experience that the revolutionary. they recognize that it had to be, it needed to be reformed. they have the a
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
degrees higher than yesterday. across northeastern china and southeastern russia and parts of north korea, this is where we find a winter storm impacting the region with snow. additional snowfall could be as much as a10 centimeters. across the rest of china, things look nice but very cold. beijing had minus 3 degrees in your morning hours. things are tapering off in myanmar where the magnitude earthquake hit near mandalay region. it will be above the norm at 32 degrees. it will remain dry the next couple of days. tokyo, as i mentioned, 22. really nice. do enjoy that weather. it's going to get colder and colder into the mid week. in the american continent we have a system pretty potent moving across kwee breck, you have a freezing rain warning across the region and then this cold front is sagging down in towards texas. along it you find wetd and windy continues. some thunderstorms will be on the severe side, especially around the arklatex region with hail of a golf ball size and tornadic activity, which cannot be ruled out. across chicago where the nfl match-up takes place in and around th
the supply delivery business to russia, they left the gulf, those small number of advisors in saudi arabia and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount
. the "a-team" coming back. the president told russia he would be very flexible after the election. [inaudible] lou: well, we're there. now the president has the flexibility and then the travel destination. we will have those for you next. that petraeus sex scandal worsens by the day. did our top spy but classified information and risk? is it just a coincidence that the white house waited until after the election? admiral james lyons joins us next. ♪ lou: general petraeus agreeing to testify on the benghazi attack, and he will do so in front of the house intelligence committee. he will be doing so behind closed doors as we now understand how that system will go. the question is, in part, as his credibility been compromised following the scandal that led to his resignation? by next guest says the scandal is a political cover and deception. joining us now, admiral james lyons, a retired commander of the u.s. pacific fleet. good to have you back with us. >> nice to be here. loo: the first question. that is, has his credibility been compromised to the point that he can be of very lit
, through japan, through china and also russia. but i do think ultimately the economy is faltering internally because of the government is able to buy as you reported and broke the story through reuters a couple weeks ago here they were getting one to $3 billion of gold into iran helping them bolster their cash. but on the other hand, goods they're buying are still not keeping up. they have 30% reduction in oil imports or exports rather. they're really suffering on things bringing inand out of the count. meliss how are they doing that? >> they're doing it through, number one, bringing in bullion from turkey and dubai. that brings in cash they need without having to deal in rials. india, japan and china purchasing 50%. their oil shipped through iranian ships orer flagships that e masking the fact that that oil is going to those countries. turkey has the pass through the sanctions of 180 delays they're still dealing with ir. russia, some defense systems they were using in the defense drills this past week were russian made, th s-200 defense system. >> this situation is not getting an
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
where it was just the united states and russia, and now i think we have to drain the swamp. there is no other way, a sane way ahead >> you worry about rogue states, of course. you worry about terrorists. you worry about accidents. have you a movie "countdown to zero" which makes this argument in a really compelling way, and it telling the story of one russian man who actually tried to sell nuclear material to al qaeda. >> yes. >> the vignette of that was rather a low level worker in a uranium plant in the former soviet union, and he knew that by taking -- he could secrete very small amounts of highly enriched uranium, and he had a buyer that was a representative al qaeda, and the whole reason that he wanted to sell that was so that he could get a refrigerator. i mean, for him that was what -- that's all it was to him, a means to, you know, make his personal life a little better. >> queen noor, when you look at this and say you want the u.s. to lead the way and russia to lead the way in reducing nuclear arsenals. the counterargument is wait a minute all the bad actors in the
in the countries, brazil, russia, india, bringing in europe, and do real nation building through economic means so you don't end up having a cold war with china or russia or entering a new gray war with al qaeda or intervention in syria or war with iran. let us hope those are not the foreign policy markers of a second term. he has a chance here. not for cold war with china, but to rebuild because china's going through terrible social instability, economic growth is plummeting. a whole series of issues to unit. >> it's worth mentioning the president announced the return of the u.s. to the tune of 170 million for projects over the next two years and that is something i'm sure the burmese welcome with open arms, but at the end of the day i think he probably could have gone with empty hands and still receive the reception he had which was people flooding the streets. reports of six and seven people deep on the sidewalks as his motorcade passed by. >> that's right. china has been offering a lot of cash, doing a lot of projects there. a lot of chinese business people in burma. china very much wants acce
published by all places, russia. here's "the wall street journal's" translation of it. the electoral system are contra districty, archaic, and more overdo not meet the democratic prince pams that that the united states proclaims are fundamental to its foreign and domestic policy. we've seen attempts to shoren the early vote period to assure one party's chances of victory. the ballots can be dozens of pages. in some they're paper, in some election and it always falls on a tuesday, a work i day. every four years wee see the chaos of american elections but not changes. this week international election observers were banned from nine states. some of these men and women were threatened with arrest. maybe we should start learning from election officials from abroad, not try to throw them into jail. >>> up next, big data in the presidential election. why what you eat and what music you listen to has everything to do with whom you voted for your. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been
. the u.s. is in third place behind russia and saudi arabia. >>> hostess brands warning it may permanently close some of its plants if union members continue to strike. the action represents 5,000 hostess workers. that is today's david, speed read [buzzer] david: gooo work. hostess doesn't have twinkies anymore, does it? sandra: that doesn't matter. david: thank you, sandy. george lucaas is sell to the film companying to $4 billion this year may save him tens of millions of dollars of capital-gains taxes if he completes the deal before rates go up january 1st. while on a much smaller scale there are many more deals being struck before the clock strikes on a 15% capital gains rate. one of the deals is made by burt wolf whose okay again business was in his family since 1936 but he sold before the higher taxes kicked in. burt joins us now. you're thinking like a billionaire because presumably why george lucas wants to sell, right? >> if you say so. david: why are you selling? what is the specific reason you're selling now? the family has been in business for three or four generations. why sel
for this earnings season. liz: you have to watch out for the middle east, europe and russia segment. it was last quarter that they did miss and lowered their full year 2013 eps schedules and that certainly spooked at least some of the analysts. that is something i think the people will really be wondering about. i am just kind of searching here. you are looking for that particular region. operating losses i am seeing of 6.5 million. >> that is a very good point. it is hard to argue that, as well. again, i think the market maybe looking like like it is priced in and discounted. if you are able, that is what you are saying. that is a very good point you raise. david: specifics as they begin to settle. we are just getting back on our feet as far as trading is concerned. >> these are the numbers. the official release has not hit yet. forty-six cents per share coming in for the fiscal fourth quarter. that beats the average estimate. one of the reasons you are seeing the stock jumped is they are boosting their forecast for next year. only by a penny on the upper range. giving them a little more breath
, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. and in fact, they were working on that. the fact that it did fail and we have no continuing presence in iraq i think is part of the reason why iran's influences spread there and so incidentally has al qaeda re- emerged again. i think those are warnings to us about how important it is to do exactly what you have called for, which is to have a good -- much smaller but
hd hasn't rolled out in turkey and russia. it's a big hedge for us. >> thank you for being here. >> appreciate it very much. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, david faber and jim cramer. we kick off the week better than we had seen last week. looking at a higher open across the board after the worse weekly losses with both indices closing below the 200-day moving average on friday. looking at the action over in europe, we are seeing small gains across the board. our road map starts on capitol hill where congress returns to work tomorrow as leaders prepare to meet with the president this week on the fiscal cliff. lawmakers over the weekend sound optimistic that a deal will be reached. how likely is that? >> jeffries gets bought in a $3.7 billion deal. leucadia is described as a mini berkshire hathaway. >> a war to see who will open earliest on black friday or on thanksgiving itself as it turns out. >> first up, after coming off the worst week for the markets
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
critical level. this here comment usaid was booted out of russia initially when i went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is the risk too much for us so that we would basically go winhelp the nation and state thank you and don't let the door hit you on the way out? thank you. >> first of all, the indonesian case, part of that is just cultural. they are far more sensitive to questions of faith than we are. so it's not infrequent that we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. but this happens all the time in life and i think you have to ask yourself what's the right thing to do and you try and do it. if you make your very best effort and someone isn't appreciative, you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it. and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people because someone related to a recipient is resentful that they weren't helped by their own kind. i would want to help. >> if i could have something to the in
in the marketplace of ideas. with state capitalism in russia, china and the persian gulf, with political islam in the middle east. with a left wing grant a democratic populism in latin america. and then out expect nation that every country would actually converge and ultimately want to look like us will not prove to be accurate. let me give you a sense as to why i think we are heading toward diversity rather than toward ideological convergence. in my mind, the rise of the west followed a unique political and social trajectory. we as americans find our roots in the year 1000, 1100, when europe began to fragment. when the three traditional institutions of authority, the monarchy, the ability -- nobility and the catholic church began to lose their strangled over society. blacksmiths, early bankers, early professionals began to push back against traditional society. and that middle-class grew in size and strength and became the vanguard of the revolution that became the west. about religious pluralism to the reformation, and then when you about political pluralism. because monarchs said to the ris
in a fundamentally different world, a world ordered by china or russia or most likely nobody at all. so there's a lot at stake here in how our economy grows and develops. part of that is going to require pulling back from missions that are completely out of proportion like afghanistan. but it's also remembering one thing: we have one unique thing that the chinese and russians don't have. we can lead by emulation. the chinese have to buy people, the russians have to bludgeon people and when we get it right, when people see us as the greatest place to get an education, start a company and get a job the effect that has in expanding our power and influence is exponential. >> rose: where does american leadership express itself in terms of going beyond its own borders. david? >> first the old-fashioned truth is power does matter and military does matter. we'll have a military presence for that. dealing with iran is going to be the number one issue the next president faces. and then finally-- and i think this again-- the blurring between that policy is that we have a lot of countries around the world facing
it will be a fundamentally different world by china or russia or most likely nobody at all. there's a lot at stake here on how our economy goes and develops. part of that is pulling mac bitions out of proportion like afghanistan. it's also remembering one thing. we have one unique thing that the chinese and russians don't have. we can lead by emlation. the chinese have to find people the chinese have to bludgenon people -- exponential. >> rose: where does american leadership express itself in terms of going beyond its own borders? david. >> first the old fashion truth is that power does matter and the military does power. filling thepacen is asia, we have military presence important that. dealing with iran is the number one issue the next president faces. you got to have some military presence for that. and then finally and i think this goes along with what people have been saying the blur between that and foreign domestic paul z we have lots of countries around the world facing crises. so we all have sort of similar problems whether it's japan, europe, us, even to some extent china which is aging wit
by all places russia. here's "the wall street journal's" translation of it. "the electoral system are contradictory archaic and moreover done meet the democratic principles that the united states claims are fundamental to its foreign and domestic policy." i hate to say, it but moscow has a point. on the one hand, we have one thing the russians don't, actual free elections. this election season we've seen attempts to shorten the early voting period to further one party's chances of victory. our ballots can be as long as a dozen pages. in some places they're paper ballots and in some they're electronic. and election day always falls on a tuesday, a working day. every four years we see the chaos of american elections, but nothing changes. this week international election observers were banned from nine states. some of these men and women were threatened with arrest. maybe we should start learning from election officials from abroad, not trying to throw them into jail. >>> up next, big data in the presidential election. why what you eat and what music you listen to has everything to d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)